Visit the Montreal Biosphere to Explore Nature, History, and Architecture

The clear dome that forms the Montreal Biosphere is one of the most iconic sights in Quebec. Visitors to Canada’s second-largest province can immerse themselves in history, science, and architectural beauty at this unique attraction.  

History of the Montreal Biosphere

The Montreal Biosphere was originally built as part of the World’s Fair Exhibition in Montreal in 1967. Buckminster Fuller, an American architect, designed the structure, which he originally named the Geodesic Dome. The large dome was originally intended to be taken down at the end of the fair, along with many surrounding structures, but it ultimately became a permanent, highly-recognizable element of the Montreal skyline.

The aesthetic dome is famous for its ability to survive multiple disasters and remain an intact piece of Canadian tourism. Nine years after the fair, the structure caught fire as a result of a welding accident, and it was closed to the public until 1995. The dome was renovated and reopened as an environmental museum in 1995, and it was again damaged by an ice storm only three years later. 

Visiting the Montreal Biosphere

The dome has been repaired for a second time, and its museum remains open. Visitors to Parc Jean-Drapeau, the large park that surrounds the museum, can visit the only North American environmental museum to learn more about the history and importance of protecting the environment. Viewing the biosphere itself can also be breathtaking and inspiring for visitors of all ages. 

Admission to the museum is $15 for adults and $10 for college students, and children under 18 are free. The museum is open daily, except on many holidays, from 10am-5pm, and guests must arrive no later than 4:15pm. 

If you plan to take public transit to view the structure, it is located a short walk from the Jean-Drapeau station on the Yellow Line.

If you’re looking for something to do that combines beauty and education on your next trip to Montreal, look no further than the Montreal Biosphere. From the structure’s intricate architecture to its fascinating history, the biosphere is sure to appeal to a variety of visitors.   

Visiting the Site of the SS Ayrfield Shipwreck

The SS Ayrfield Shipwreck can get found in Homebush Bay, which is a bay on the southern bank of the Parramatta River. The Parramatta River gets located on the Inner West Bay of Sydney, Australia. The SS Ayrfield has been sitting in the same foliage over 100 years ago and still sits in Homebush Bay to this day.

The catch is: this cargo ship never sank, which is rather miraculous given all the trees and foliage that have become intertwined with the base of the ship in the last century.

History of the SS Ayrfield Shipwreck

The SS Ayrfield shipwreck can be viewed still floating in the water from the nearby lands around Homebush Bay. The same can get said for many other ships that have been stranded in the area or wrecked nearby. Most ships that wrecked here in this area have been there for at least a century since the area was a bustling trading post to Australia back in the late 1800s and into the early 20th century.

Homebush Bay Gets Brought Back to Life

The area was revamped and refurbished by the economic boom that hosting the 2000 Olympics brought to the area. Homebush Bay has now been made into a tourist destination as the funds that were sunk into the area rebuilt it to be similar to the bustling trading post that it was back over a century ago when these types of cargo ships frequented the area to trade supplies with those who lived in the area.

SS Ayrfield a Tourist’s Attraction

The SS Ayrfield’s remains and so many others are seen as tourist attractions today The SS Ayrfield is essentially an amazing, floating platform covered by a small forest. Many tours that come through the area where the SS Ayrfield rests also take people to see other local attractions such as Hyde Park and other tours even take people throughout the entire city of Sydney to see many other great attractions!

Conclusion

If you are in the Sydney area, the SS Ayrfield is an attraction worth stopping to see! Prices are quite affordable, and people who have gone on these tours give it great reviews on sites such as TripAdvisor.

If you are ever in the Sydney area, it’s definitely worth stopping by the SS Ayrfield and witnessing what is now a beautiful floating forest! 

Serenity in the Sand

Beaches are a place of wonder, and not every beach trip is made equal. There are many different ways to enjoy a day (or a week) in the sand. Even the beaches themselves are different. Sleeping Bear Dunes in northern Michigan, for example, boasts beautiful dunes you can climb, trails to walk, and a beautiful view of the lake, which is a vastly different experience than a trip to La Chiva Beach in Puerto Rico. La Chiva sports crystal clear waters for snorkeling and water that is an awe inspiring blue. 

Origins of Beach Vacations

Beaches didn’t always promote feeling of relaxation and tranquility. In fact, it was quite the opposite! According to Smithsonian Magazine, beaches were feared as being wild and dangerous. They were a place of shipwrecks and natural disasters. That viewpoint wouldn’t change until the mid 1700’s. It wasn’t until the 20th century that beach vacations started becoming popular in the Americas, Paste reports. 

Tranquility of the Water

Walking slowly along the beach as the sand shifts between your toes and over your feet, while looking out over the small, blue, crashing waves can bring feelings of relaxation in a class of its own. And science can prove it! Inc discusses the calming effect the color blue can have on the brain activity as well as the benefits walking over sand has on pressure points in your feet. Going to the beach is proven to be good for your health. Start planning your beach trip now, it’s for your overall well being. 

Precautions

As relaxing as the beach can be, there are still times when it could be dangerous. Be sure to check with the correct local offices or authorities to determine if the conditions of the beach will be safe before you head out. Things such as high water levels, riptides, or other weather events could be a factor in determining the safety of the beach. 

Extreme Love

After some ups and downs in her life, Janet Blaser took a trip to Mazatlán, Mexico. She loved the beach, the people, and the culture so much she moved there! She now lives for about $1000 a month on the beach in Mexico, and can’t imagine being anywhere else. 

Learn about Aussie History at the South Australian Museum

The South Australian Museum, located in the heart of Adelaide, is one of Australia’s most popular museums among both Australians and international travelers. From biology and paleontology to Australian culture throughout the ages and other areas of humanities, this massive museum has something for everyone. 

History of the South Australian Museum 

The South Australian Museum has been home to a plethora of Australian artifacts for over 150 years. It was born out of the South Australian Literary Society, one of the first organized groups with an interest in collecting historical artifacts and using them for educational purposes. The museum’s approximately 90 staff members aim to preserve centuries of both cultural and natural history to keep both today’s and future Australians connected to the past. 

South Australian Museum Exhibits

Some of the South Australian Museum’s most popular current exhibits describe the history of women in science and photography by Mat Beetson, the Australian Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year. Other popular collections include ancient Australian culture, fossils, gems and rocks, and many more. 

Visiting the South Australian Museum 

The South Australian Museum is located on the North Terrace in downtown Adelaide, which is easily accessible by public transit, bicycle, or car. The museum is open from 10am-5pm every day except for ANZAC Day, Good Friday, and Christmas Day. While entry to the museum is free, visiting some areas may have an additional fee.   

Because the museum is so large, it can be a good idea to arrive early in the day. This makes it easier to avoid crowds and increases the amount of time that you have available to explore. Be sure to wear shoes that you will be comfortable walking in for much of the day. The museum includes a gift shop and cafe, and it is available for school groups and birthday parties. 

If you’re heading to Australia and are looking for a free and fun way to learn about Australian culture and history, look no further than the South Australian Museum. This museum introduces both locals and visitors from halfway around the world to nearly every aspect of cultural and natural history.  

Go Surfing to Catch a Wave

Both professional and amateur surfers live for the exhilarating experience of riding the biggest wave they can find. If you’re heading to Hawaii, California, or another tropical destination, going surfing can be a great way to experience local culture while enjoying the ocean. 

History of Surfing

Surfing has been around for several centuries. The earliest known record of surfing is from 1767 in Tahiti, and it is believed that the sport has likely existed in some form since ancient times. While the first surfing competitions as we know them today did not appear until the 20th century, early Polynesian cultures are believed to have chosen their village leaders based on their surfing ability. 

Surfing Equipment and Safety

Choosing the right surfboard is the most important step in planning a memorable surfing experience. Surfboards are generally made of coated foam or other lightweight materials, and they come in a variety of sizes and types. Be sure to select a board that is appropriate for your height and matches the type of waves that you plan to surf on. 

Always dress appropriately in order to protect yourself from the sun, your board, and the water. Depending on where you are surfing, wear a wetsuit or a rash guard and board shorts, rather than a bikini, t-shirt, or other clothing. Other essential equipment includes a leash to keep the surfer connected to the surfboard, surf wax to help the surfer avoid slipping off the surfboard, and surf earplugs to protect the ears from extreme temperature or pressure differences.

Always bring plenty of water, and avoid surfing during the sunniest hours in the middle of the day whenever possible. Never go surfing alone, and use extreme caution when surfing in unfamiliar areas.    

Competitive Surfing

Tourists surf occasionally on vacation, but natives to top surfing areas often participate in a variety of competitions that may lead to careers as professional surfers. Children, teens, and adults who live in Hawaii, California, and other tropical areas often spend part of the majority of their days in the ocean, and natives to coastal cities often begin building their swimming and surfing skills from a young age. Bethany Hamilton, a Hawaiian surfer, became well-known as a teen, and she continues to inspire both surfers and other women around the world.     

Where Can I Go Surfing?

While surfing is often thought of as a Hawaiian sport, it can be done in virtually any coastal city that is located in a tropical climate. According to the Travel Channel, some of the best places to catch a wave around the world include California, Costa Rica, Australia, Morocco, and Tahiti, in addition to Hawaii. Many top tourist destinations offer surfing lessons and equipment rental.  

If you’re heading to Hawaii or another popular ocean destination, be sure to add surfing lessons to your to-do list and get ready to have some fun in the sun!

The Old Gum Tree’s Place in South Australia’s History

Many of us as children learned the words to a fun song, “Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree, merry, merry king of the bush is he. Laugh, Kookaburra, laugh, Kookaburra, how gay your life must be!”

The song originated from a contest in 1934 organized by the Girl Guides’ Association of Victoria, Australia. It was penned by Marion Sinclair, a former teacher, poet, and composer from Werribee, Victoria, who was very familiar with gum trees, and most specifically a special one.

Glenelg’s History and its Gum Tree

Gum trees are smooth-barked trees, members of the Eucalyptus family, and native to Australia. It was under the shade of one particularly large, bent over gum tree that in December 1836, a proclamation was read establishing South Australia as a British province.

Ships under the direction of Colonial Secretary Robert Gouger had landed on that hot December day with settlers developing a makeshift camp, and Rear-Admiral Sir John Hindmarsh declaring that proclamation. Hindmarsh was named governor of the province. That gum tree resided in Glenelg, recognized today as the oldest European settlement on mainland South Australia. It is located along the southern coast, about a 25-minute drive from the city of Adelaide.

Glenelg Today

The old gum tree is gone, having died out in the 1900s. Attempts had been made to preserve the tree including its base being surrounded by cement in hopes of keeping it from collapsing. It wasn’t until 1963, the tree’s decayed outer shell was encased with cement and plastic.

This area of Glenelg is now a park known as the Old Gum Tree Preserve. It is open daily for visitors with all hometown park facilities including picnic areas, BBQ pits, playgrounds, and a memorial to the old gum tree and its part in Australia’s history.

There are approximately 900 species of eucalyptus in Australian forests. The historic gum tree is believed to have been a red gum. The kookaburra is a member of the kingfisher family and native to Australia and New Guinea. Also known as the Laughing Kookaburra, its laughing cackle can best be heard in the early morning or evening before nightfall.