Visit the Montreal Biosphere to Explore Nature, History, and Architecture

The clear dome that forms the Montreal Biosphere is one of the most iconic sights in Quebec. Visitors to Canada’s second-largest province can immerse themselves in history, science, and architectural beauty at this unique attraction.  

History of the Montreal Biosphere

The Montreal Biosphere was originally built as part of the World’s Fair Exhibition in Montreal in 1967. Buckminster Fuller, an American architect, designed the structure, which he originally named the Geodesic Dome. The large dome was originally intended to be taken down at the end of the fair, along with many surrounding structures, but it ultimately became a permanent, highly-recognizable element of the Montreal skyline.

The aesthetic dome is famous for its ability to survive multiple disasters and remain an intact piece of Canadian tourism. Nine years after the fair, the structure caught fire as a result of a welding accident, and it was closed to the public until 1995. The dome was renovated and reopened as an environmental museum in 1995, and it was again damaged by an ice storm only three years later. 

Visiting the Montreal Biosphere

The dome has been repaired for a second time, and its museum remains open. Visitors to Parc Jean-Drapeau, the large park that surrounds the museum, can visit the only North American environmental museum to learn more about the history and importance of protecting the environment. Viewing the biosphere itself can also be breathtaking and inspiring for visitors of all ages. 

Admission to the museum is $15 for adults and $10 for college students, and children under 18 are free. The museum is open daily, except on many holidays, from 10am-5pm, and guests must arrive no later than 4:15pm. 

If you plan to take public transit to view the structure, it is located a short walk from the Jean-Drapeau station on the Yellow Line.

If you’re looking for something to do that combines beauty and education on your next trip to Montreal, look no further than the Montreal Biosphere. From the structure’s intricate architecture to its fascinating history, the biosphere is sure to appeal to a variety of visitors.   

Visit the Glowworm Tunnel for an Illuminated Hike

If you’re searching for something unusual to do on your next trip to the Outback, look no further than the Glowworm Tunnel in Helensburgh. While you probably won’t find this obscure attraction in your Australia travel guide, it just might make you forget the Australian countryside and feel as though you’re in another world. 

History of the Glowworm Tunnel 

Until 1995, the Metropolitan Tunnel, also known as the Glowworm Tunnel, was just like any other abandoned railroad tunnel. It was closed in 1915, filled with water, and was largely ignored for eighty years. During the decades of being untouched by humans, a large number of luminescent glowworms began to call the tunnel home. The glowworms lingered after the tunnel was drained in 1995, and the now brightly-lit tunnel has become a popular tourist attraction for visitors to Australia that enjoy finding things to do that their friends have never heard of. 

Visiting the Glowworm Tunnel 

Although the Glowworm Tunnel can be visited year round, it is a good idea to check the weather before trekking out of town to check out this unique sight. Light rain can make the rocks inside the tunnel slippery and difficult to walk on, and strong rain can flood the tunnel. However, if you enjoy canoeing or kayaking, floating through the flooded tunnel can create the most unforgettable ride you’ve ever been on.

Be sure to pack comfortable shoes with good grips to minimize slipping, and dress in layers, as the interior of the tunnel may be cooler or more humid than the outdoor temperature. Bring plenty of water and snacks if you’re planning to stay for a while. While the tunnel can be a magical sight for children, be sure to instruct them before you arrive to walk carefully, not run, and not touch the glowworms unless instructed to do so. 

While the Metropolitan Tunnel is one of the brightest and best-known places to find glowworms, there are others throughout Australia and New Zealand. If there’s an Australian vacation in your future, be sure to add the Glowworm Tunnel to your list of must-see sights!  

Visit a Real Enchanted Forest in British Columbia

Enchanted forests have existed in childhood imaginations for centuries thanks to a myriad of fairy tales written and passed on from generation-to-generation. Visions of sugar plums aren’t just dancing in Christmas rhymes, hundreds of stationary fairy-folk, magical cottages, babbling brooks and slow-moving streams full of spawning salmon all come alive at The Enchanted Forest in Canada.

This isn’t your ordinary, run-of-the-mill, dime-a-dozen type of a theme park with stereotypical rides and carnival games intentionally designed to deny players a prize. Instead, visitor’s imaginations will go wild soaking in all of the magical sights and sounds at this truly out-of-the-ordinary destination that’s visually stunning found deep in the forests of British Columbia.

Lucious Location

The Enchanted Forest is located around 23 miles west of Revelstoke, another 275 miles west of Calgary or 420 miles northeast from Seattle, Washington. Basically, it’s in the middle of nowhere, but it’s a positively breathtaking, beautiful location that was carefully selected as a remote location by the original creators of this magical dreamland.

The Labor of Love Behind a Dreamland

This wooded wonderland was the brainchild of Ernest and Doris Needham, a real-life fairy-tale couple from the middle of the last century. Doris was an artist local to Revelstoke whose muse was primarily fairy-tale figurines that were all hand-crafted without the use of traditional molds or conventional forms. Along with her loving husband Ernest, the duo searched for over two years to find the perfect, isolated home for hundreds of her one-of-a-kind creations and handiwork. 

The couple would spend their golden years of retirement clearing at least eight of 40 acres of the forest they leased and eventually purchased from the crown. They performed all of the clearings of trails and pathways entirely by hand using only shovels, picks and a crosscut saw. In a labor of love and devotion, Ernest constructed their unique home, the Candy Cane cottage with a gravity-fed water system from a nearby waterfall that’s still in existence today.  

Alluring and Amazing Attractions

The main trail through this fantastic forest is home to over 350 folk art figurines along with British Columbia’s tallest treehouse rising over 50 feet into the lush, green woods. There’s also a giant cedar tree stump-house, a castle complete with dungeons and a dragon. With surprises around almost every corner, this is a magical, must-see destination for adults and children of all ages. 

Visiting the Site of the SS Ayrfield Shipwreck

The SS Ayrfield Shipwreck can get found in Homebush Bay, which is a bay on the southern bank of the Parramatta River. The Parramatta River gets located on the Inner West Bay of Sydney, Australia. The SS Ayrfield has been sitting in the same foliage over 100 years ago and still sits in Homebush Bay to this day.

The catch is: this cargo ship never sank, which is rather miraculous given all the trees and foliage that have become intertwined with the base of the ship in the last century.

History of the SS Ayrfield Shipwreck

The SS Ayrfield shipwreck can be viewed still floating in the water from the nearby lands around Homebush Bay. The same can get said for many other ships that have been stranded in the area or wrecked nearby. Most ships that wrecked here in this area have been there for at least a century since the area was a bustling trading post to Australia back in the late 1800s and into the early 20th century.

Homebush Bay Gets Brought Back to Life

The area was revamped and refurbished by the economic boom that hosting the 2000 Olympics brought to the area. Homebush Bay has now been made into a tourist destination as the funds that were sunk into the area rebuilt it to be similar to the bustling trading post that it was back over a century ago when these types of cargo ships frequented the area to trade supplies with those who lived in the area.

SS Ayrfield a Tourist’s Attraction

The SS Ayrfield’s remains and so many others are seen as tourist attractions today The SS Ayrfield is essentially an amazing, floating platform covered by a small forest. Many tours that come through the area where the SS Ayrfield rests also take people to see other local attractions such as Hyde Park and other tours even take people throughout the entire city of Sydney to see many other great attractions!

Conclusion

If you are in the Sydney area, the SS Ayrfield is an attraction worth stopping to see! Prices are quite affordable, and people who have gone on these tours give it great reviews on sites such as TripAdvisor.

If you are ever in the Sydney area, it’s definitely worth stopping by the SS Ayrfield and witnessing what is now a beautiful floating forest! 

Serenity in the Sand

Beaches are a place of wonder, and not every beach trip is made equal. There are many different ways to enjoy a day (or a week) in the sand. Even the beaches themselves are different. Sleeping Bear Dunes in northern Michigan, for example, boasts beautiful dunes you can climb, trails to walk, and a beautiful view of the lake, which is a vastly different experience than a trip to La Chiva Beach in Puerto Rico. La Chiva sports crystal clear waters for snorkeling and water that is an awe inspiring blue. 

Origins of Beach Vacations

Beaches didn’t always promote feeling of relaxation and tranquility. In fact, it was quite the opposite! According to Smithsonian Magazine, beaches were feared as being wild and dangerous. They were a place of shipwrecks and natural disasters. That viewpoint wouldn’t change until the mid 1700’s. It wasn’t until the 20th century that beach vacations started becoming popular in the Americas, Paste reports. 

Tranquility of the Water

Walking slowly along the beach as the sand shifts between your toes and over your feet, while looking out over the small, blue, crashing waves can bring feelings of relaxation in a class of its own. And science can prove it! Inc discusses the calming effect the color blue can have on the brain activity as well as the benefits walking over sand has on pressure points in your feet. Going to the beach is proven to be good for your health. Start planning your beach trip now, it’s for your overall well being. 

Precautions

As relaxing as the beach can be, there are still times when it could be dangerous. Be sure to check with the correct local offices or authorities to determine if the conditions of the beach will be safe before you head out. Things such as high water levels, riptides, or other weather events could be a factor in determining the safety of the beach. 

Extreme Love

After some ups and downs in her life, Janet Blaser took a trip to Mazatlán, Mexico. She loved the beach, the people, and the culture so much she moved there! She now lives for about $1000 a month on the beach in Mexico, and can’t imagine being anywhere else. 

Learn about Aussie History at the South Australian Museum

The South Australian Museum, located in the heart of Adelaide, is one of Australia’s most popular museums among both Australians and international travelers. From biology and paleontology to Australian culture throughout the ages and other areas of humanities, this massive museum has something for everyone. 

History of the South Australian Museum 

The South Australian Museum has been home to a plethora of Australian artifacts for over 150 years. It was born out of the South Australian Literary Society, one of the first organized groups with an interest in collecting historical artifacts and using them for educational purposes. The museum’s approximately 90 staff members aim to preserve centuries of both cultural and natural history to keep both today’s and future Australians connected to the past. 

South Australian Museum Exhibits

Some of the South Australian Museum’s most popular current exhibits describe the history of women in science and photography by Mat Beetson, the Australian Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year. Other popular collections include ancient Australian culture, fossils, gems and rocks, and many more. 

Visiting the South Australian Museum 

The South Australian Museum is located on the North Terrace in downtown Adelaide, which is easily accessible by public transit, bicycle, or car. The museum is open from 10am-5pm every day except for ANZAC Day, Good Friday, and Christmas Day. While entry to the museum is free, visiting some areas may have an additional fee.   

Because the museum is so large, it can be a good idea to arrive early in the day. This makes it easier to avoid crowds and increases the amount of time that you have available to explore. Be sure to wear shoes that you will be comfortable walking in for much of the day. The museum includes a gift shop and cafe, and it is available for school groups and birthday parties. 

If you’re heading to Australia and are looking for a free and fun way to learn about Australian culture and history, look no further than the South Australian Museum. This museum introduces both locals and visitors from halfway around the world to nearly every aspect of cultural and natural history.