Visit the Montreal Biosphere to Explore Nature, History, and Architecture

The clear dome that forms the Montreal Biosphere is one of the most iconic sights in Quebec. Visitors to Canada’s second-largest province can immerse themselves in history, science, and architectural beauty at this unique attraction.  

History of the Montreal Biosphere

The Montreal Biosphere was originally built as part of the World’s Fair Exhibition in Montreal in 1967. Buckminster Fuller, an American architect, designed the structure, which he originally named the Geodesic Dome. The large dome was originally intended to be taken down at the end of the fair, along with many surrounding structures, but it ultimately became a permanent, highly-recognizable element of the Montreal skyline.

The aesthetic dome is famous for its ability to survive multiple disasters and remain an intact piece of Canadian tourism. Nine years after the fair, the structure caught fire as a result of a welding accident, and it was closed to the public until 1995. The dome was renovated and reopened as an environmental museum in 1995, and it was again damaged by an ice storm only three years later. 

Visiting the Montreal Biosphere

The dome has been repaired for a second time, and its museum remains open. Visitors to Parc Jean-Drapeau, the large park that surrounds the museum, can visit the only North American environmental museum to learn more about the history and importance of protecting the environment. Viewing the biosphere itself can also be breathtaking and inspiring for visitors of all ages. 

Admission to the museum is $15 for adults and $10 for college students, and children under 18 are free. The museum is open daily, except on many holidays, from 10am-5pm, and guests must arrive no later than 4:15pm. 

If you plan to take public transit to view the structure, it is located a short walk from the Jean-Drapeau station on the Yellow Line.

If you’re looking for something to do that combines beauty and education on your next trip to Montreal, look no further than the Montreal Biosphere. From the structure’s intricate architecture to its fascinating history, the biosphere is sure to appeal to a variety of visitors.   

Visit a Real Enchanted Forest in British Columbia

Enchanted forests have existed in childhood imaginations for centuries thanks to a myriad of fairy tales written and passed on from generation-to-generation. Visions of sugar plums aren’t just dancing in Christmas rhymes, hundreds of stationary fairy-folk, magical cottages, babbling brooks and slow-moving streams full of spawning salmon all come alive at The Enchanted Forest in Canada.

This isn’t your ordinary, run-of-the-mill, dime-a-dozen type of a theme park with stereotypical rides and carnival games intentionally designed to deny players a prize. Instead, visitor’s imaginations will go wild soaking in all of the magical sights and sounds at this truly out-of-the-ordinary destination that’s visually stunning found deep in the forests of British Columbia.

Lucious Location

The Enchanted Forest is located around 23 miles west of Revelstoke, another 275 miles west of Calgary or 420 miles northeast from Seattle, Washington. Basically, it’s in the middle of nowhere, but it’s a positively breathtaking, beautiful location that was carefully selected as a remote location by the original creators of this magical dreamland.

The Labor of Love Behind a Dreamland

This wooded wonderland was the brainchild of Ernest and Doris Needham, a real-life fairy-tale couple from the middle of the last century. Doris was an artist local to Revelstoke whose muse was primarily fairy-tale figurines that were all hand-crafted without the use of traditional molds or conventional forms. Along with her loving husband Ernest, the duo searched for over two years to find the perfect, isolated home for hundreds of her one-of-a-kind creations and handiwork. 

The couple would spend their golden years of retirement clearing at least eight of 40 acres of the forest they leased and eventually purchased from the crown. They performed all of the clearings of trails and pathways entirely by hand using only shovels, picks and a crosscut saw. In a labor of love and devotion, Ernest constructed their unique home, the Candy Cane cottage with a gravity-fed water system from a nearby waterfall that’s still in existence today.  

Alluring and Amazing Attractions

The main trail through this fantastic forest is home to over 350 folk art figurines along with British Columbia’s tallest treehouse rising over 50 feet into the lush, green woods. There’s also a giant cedar tree stump-house, a castle complete with dungeons and a dragon. With surprises around almost every corner, this is a magical, must-see destination for adults and children of all ages.