Visit the Montreal Biosphere to Explore Nature, History, and Architecture

The clear dome that forms the Montreal Biosphere is one of the most iconic sights in Quebec. Visitors to Canada’s second-largest province can immerse themselves in history, science, and architectural beauty at this unique attraction.  

History of the Montreal Biosphere

The Montreal Biosphere was originally built as part of the World’s Fair Exhibition in Montreal in 1967. Buckminster Fuller, an American architect, designed the structure, which he originally named the Geodesic Dome. The large dome was originally intended to be taken down at the end of the fair, along with many surrounding structures, but it ultimately became a permanent, highly-recognizable element of the Montreal skyline.

The aesthetic dome is famous for its ability to survive multiple disasters and remain an intact piece of Canadian tourism. Nine years after the fair, the structure caught fire as a result of a welding accident, and it was closed to the public until 1995. The dome was renovated and reopened as an environmental museum in 1995, and it was again damaged by an ice storm only three years later. 

Visiting the Montreal Biosphere

The dome has been repaired for a second time, and its museum remains open. Visitors to Parc Jean-Drapeau, the large park that surrounds the museum, can visit the only North American environmental museum to learn more about the history and importance of protecting the environment. Viewing the biosphere itself can also be breathtaking and inspiring for visitors of all ages. 

Admission to the museum is $15 for adults and $10 for college students, and children under 18 are free. The museum is open daily, except on many holidays, from 10am-5pm, and guests must arrive no later than 4:15pm. 

If you plan to take public transit to view the structure, it is located a short walk from the Jean-Drapeau station on the Yellow Line.

If you’re looking for something to do that combines beauty and education on your next trip to Montreal, look no further than the Montreal Biosphere. From the structure’s intricate architecture to its fascinating history, the biosphere is sure to appeal to a variety of visitors.   

Learn about Aussie History at the South Australian Museum

The South Australian Museum, located in the heart of Adelaide, is one of Australia’s most popular museums among both Australians and international travelers. From biology and paleontology to Australian culture throughout the ages and other areas of humanities, this massive museum has something for everyone. 

History of the South Australian Museum 

The South Australian Museum has been home to a plethora of Australian artifacts for over 150 years. It was born out of the South Australian Literary Society, one of the first organized groups with an interest in collecting historical artifacts and using them for educational purposes. The museum’s approximately 90 staff members aim to preserve centuries of both cultural and natural history to keep both today’s and future Australians connected to the past. 

South Australian Museum Exhibits

Some of the South Australian Museum’s most popular current exhibits describe the history of women in science and photography by Mat Beetson, the Australian Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year. Other popular collections include ancient Australian culture, fossils, gems and rocks, and many more. 

Visiting the South Australian Museum 

The South Australian Museum is located on the North Terrace in downtown Adelaide, which is easily accessible by public transit, bicycle, or car. The museum is open from 10am-5pm every day except for ANZAC Day, Good Friday, and Christmas Day. While entry to the museum is free, visiting some areas may have an additional fee.   

Because the museum is so large, it can be a good idea to arrive early in the day. This makes it easier to avoid crowds and increases the amount of time that you have available to explore. Be sure to wear shoes that you will be comfortable walking in for much of the day. The museum includes a gift shop and cafe, and it is available for school groups and birthday parties. 

If you’re heading to Australia and are looking for a free and fun way to learn about Australian culture and history, look no further than the South Australian Museum. This museum introduces both locals and visitors from halfway around the world to nearly every aspect of cultural and natural history.